Multicore NZ

September 22, 2009

Talking Parallel with James Reinders (Intel)

Filed under: Education and Training, Parallel Programming — multicoreblog @ 9:09 pm

I’ve been invited to “the exclusive Talk Parallel session” with James Reinders this Thursday, Sept. 24, at 8 a.m. PST. (brrrr!! it will be 3:00 am Friday 25 in New Zealand!!)

I already warned wife and kids that they don’t need to worry about me turning insomniac and talking parallelism in the middle of the night…It is just an example of the sacrifices of entrepreneurship…:-))

With 20 years at Intel, today James is the Chief Evangelist + Director of Marketing & Sales Development at Intel’s Software & Solutions Group, based in Portland, Oregon. But above all, looks like a cool guy from our email and LinkedIn exchanges.


“…the live chat will take place via the Internet, so no phone call-in will be needed. We hope this will be most convenient for the participants on the road at IDF.”


The invitation keeps saying: “So, what’s different about this session with James? Talk Parallel is an opportunity to submit your questions, plus gain insight from the dialogue with others who are also deeply involved in writing and thinking about parallelism. As a preview of the questions James will address, here’s a sampling of a few submitted by your peers:

Do you have plans to add support for other programming languages in future Intel® Parallel Studio and Intel® Parallel Advisor versions? Are C#* and/or Java* in the future plans?
The Von Neumann bottleneck will ultimately limit the number of cores connected to an individual memory. I see a hybrid future of blended OpenMP* and MPI* algorithms. What future do you see, what predominant architectures, and what programming paradigms?
Is the penny starting to drop among developers who fail to see independent streams and take advantage of parallelism again and again?

Horizontal rule

I also submitted my questions :-)

But will post later a balance of the conversation.

What caught my attention earlier this year about James’ activities was the workshop on teaching parallelism in a high school (see post). The best summary of this initiative is the sentence “…plant seeds in minds that can solve problems that don’t yet exist”. This article also gives a brief about the experience.

Then I started to think that if it is possible in high school, why not primary school.

Next week will meet with the Principal of the school of my 9 years old son…If Piaget studied his children to develop his theories, why not try with the (less?) ambitious goal of “thinking parallel” from scratch?

Nicolás Erdödy

Oamaru, New Zealand

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